greek

(no subject)

The passage of years really hits me when I hear about cities bidding to host the Olympics in the future. I'll hear about bids for the 2020 games, go "Jesus Christ, slow the fuck down would you. 2020?" and then realize that's only 9 years from now.
greek

(no subject)

Ask a biology/physics/math question, get a bunch of "I don't knows" and one or two answers if someone actually knows.

Ask a linguistics question, get 15 different correct answers and at least 1 person who seems to hate themselves because they can't do standard grammar like they were taught in school.
greek

(no subject)

I wonder if the same people who chastise Americans for not going metric (since metric is more universal and logical) would agree to spelling reform of English, to make it more universal and logical.  Nah, they'd probably just bemoan the downfall of Western civilization and education.

Oh well, it was an idea at least.
greek

(no subject)

I feel very energized today.  This is despite only having slept in two 2-hour bursts yesterday evening and being up since 3 AM working.  I'm straddling that fine line between motivation and exhaustion.
greek

Definition

Miracle. n. A positive occurrence, usually completely within the bounds of physics, such as the birth of a child, or when someone who is shot doesn't die.
greek

(no subject)

I look at people who are highly judgmental of others' language usage the same way I look at creationists.

I've heard it argued by creationists, for example, that they accept some forms of evolution - microevolution, as they call it, or small variations within individual species that occur on a generational level. They just don't accept MACROevolution, or in other words, the idea that a species could become another, different species. Evolution on a grand scale, what brought us all where we are today.

In other words, they're not so oblivious as to reject the obvious, but they are so stuck in their own beliefs that it's either hard for them or they refuse to see the mile-long ramifications of the inch they've given. Those small step evolutions are what lead to the large changes... they're all pieces of the same thing!

Some of the more annoying language prescriptivists can be the same way. Of course, language changes, they'll often say, no one can deny that. I mean, if language didn't change, Old English never would have become Modern English, and that'd just be the tip of the iceberg.

Oh no, but not THAT change. That isn't "language change," that's incorrect usage. That's ignorant. The only possible explanation for someone actually daring to switch around the sounds in the word "nuclear," or to pronounce the word "ask" as "aks" is either flippant dismissal of our pure language, or utter stupidity. Now, yes, I pronounce the word "iron" as if the R came before the N, but the difference there is that enough people do that one that it's okay now. That's called language change!

Today's incorrect usage is tomorrow's standard, and it's been that way since the beginning of human language -- the only difference being that this kind of nonsensical pedantry isn't quite as old as human language.

There really is no such thing as incorrect usage in the spoken word, since there is no objective truth, no ideal in language. Of course there's a standard, and of course it helps to have a certain level of adherence to said standard to aid in communication. But that usually works itself out on its own, and people who have the need and desire to communicate with each other will find a way. Either they'll speak the same language, or they'll find a way to bridge the gap between them.
greek

(no subject)

Do a Google maps search for driving directions from Memphis, TN to Tokyo, Japan. (this may work with your hometown as well, but sometimes it doesn't)

These are some very sensible directions. Halfway through kayaking across the Pacific Ocean, they even schedule you for a pit stop in Honolulu. This is wise, as you might get tired a few thousand miles in.

The most amusing thing for me isn't the kayaking thing, but that Google assumes you have a car waiting for you in Honolulu and in Japan.